Now Showing on Cable: “Crazy, Stupid, Love.”

Premiering on HBO this weekend was last year’s comedy about romance, “Crazy, Stupid, Love.”

In it, Steve Carell stars as a man whose wife suddenly requests a divorce. Left depressed and disillusioned, Carell is offered advice by a local lothario (Ryan Gosling) for regaining his masculinity. Thus begins a comedy about romance, relationships and resiliency.

With an all-star cast and a fun script, “Crazy, Stupid, Love.” was a very entertaining comedy, and an easy movie to recommend to you all.

Continue reading

About these ads

Movies That Everyone Should See: “The Big Lebowski”

20110910-065036.jpg

LOL.

Where to begin?

If anyone needs to be informed, “The Big Lebowski” is a 1998 comedy written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen.

The plot is reportedly loosely based around Raymond Chandler’s 1939 novel, “The Big Sleep”. Now. I’ve never read the novel, so I can’t attest to any similarities or dissimilarities, but aside from the fact that the movie involves a kidnapping, I can’t imagine they’re very much alike. “The Big Lebowski” is one of the most eccentric, off-kilter, oddball stories in major motion picture history. After some thieves break in and urinate on the rug in his apartment in a case of mistaken identity, an unemployed bowling enthusiast (assisted by an unstable Vietnam Vet) finds himself tasked with resolving a kidnapping that involves a handicapped millionaire, a nymphomaniac trophy wife and a small cadre of pornographers. He winds up assaulted by the police, seduced by a feminist, accosted by nihilists, drugged by a porn mogul, involved in multiple minor car accidents and coated in cremated human remains.

Along the way he manages to squeeze some bowling in.

Continue reading

Now showing on cable: “The Kids Are Alright”

Sorry, I’ve fallen a little behind on my movies due to the whole Comic-Con thing. This movie actually hit cable a couple of weeks ago. It’s making its rounds now on HBO.

“The Kids Are Alright” is the story of two teenaged children of a lesbian couple who seek out the sperm donor the women used… their biological father. The kids arrange the meeting on their own, but once the Moms learn about it, they insist on meeting him themselves.

Essentially the movie is a relationship dramedy with Ruffalo’s character, Paul, being the straw that stirs the drink. Paul is a laid back, earthy, single restaurant owner. His interjection into this family unsettles the prim and proper Nic (Bening) and reaffirms Jules (Moore). Soon the women are bickering as the balance of power between them shifts. His influence also acts as a change agent in the life of the two kids. Before you know it, you have an entire family questioning their relationships to each other…

Continue reading