The Ten WORST Bond Girls

As demonstrated in the previous post, Bond girls often add positively to the legacy of the franchise. Whether they’re objects of affection, team-mates or both, the women of 007 are capable of adding so much to the movies that they’re featured in.

Of course, they can also drag on the movie like an albatross.

Yes, unfortunately, over the course of 50 years and 20+ movies you’re going to have more than your share of bad characters and/or bad actresses. Especially when so often – let’s be honest – the actresses are cast due to their looks. Read on to see the ten worst offenders in the Bond Franchise!

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The Great Debates: Who is the Best Bond?

The big question. For years, Sean Connery was the pat answer, but lately, Daniel Craig has been making a serious run at the throne. Will the strength of the modern movie-making in his films help him unseat the King? How many fans of the campy Roger Moore era are out there? Dalton has his supporters, but just how many? Can people forgive Brosnan for the movies he was in and judge him as the Bond he was? Will anyone vote Lazenby?

Click through to read the tale of the tape!!

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James Bond: Classic, Cheese, or Crap? – BONUS “Never Say Never Again”

“Never Say Never Again”

1983

Bond: Sean Connery

Classic, Cheese, or Crap?: CRAP

In 1958, Ian Fleming began trying to bring his famous spy to the big screen. He was introduced to a writer named Kevin McClory, and together (eventually joined by screenwriter Jack Wittingham), they began work on a screenplay they would eventually title, “Thunderball.” Due to the failure of McClory’s first feature film, however, Fleming lost interest in the collaboration. Instead of pursuing the screenplay further, he cannibalized the major elements (including SPECTRE and Blofeld) and turned them into a new novel of the same name.

The story would eventually make it to the big screen once Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman began adapting the books.

But behind the scenes, Kevin McClory was fighting in the courts for his rights to the original Thunderball screenplay. It was a legal fight that would lead to the death of Blofeld, the end of SPECTRE, and eventually, “Never Say Never Again”.

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